Tag Archives: 1968

Live a Little, Love a Little

Live A Little, Love A Little is a 1968 musical comedy starring Elvis Presley. It was directed by Norman Taurog, who had directed several previous Presley vehicles; this was his final film. It had a more mature tone than other Presley musicals, with coarse language, drug references, and an implied sexual encounter. The film introduced the song “A Little Less Conversation”; a later re-recording of it would form the basis of a remix that returned Presley to the American music sales charts in the early 2000s.

In Live A Little, Love A Little, Elvis Presley plays Greg Nolan, a newspaper photographer who lives a fun and carefree life. That is, until he meets a headcase named Bernice, who assumes different names and personalities whenever the mood hits her. She manages to lose his job and apartment after drugging him. However, she manages to find him another apartment, and he wants to pay her back. So he gets two photographer jobs: one at a Playboy-like magazine and the other at a very conservative magazine. He now has to manage balancing the two jobs along with dealing with Bernice and her odd ways.

Bernice manages to get him a new apartment, but it is so expensive that he has to take on two full-time jobs to make the payments.

As Greg hustles back and forth between the two photography jobs (one for a stuffy conservative publisher, and the other for a ‘girlie’ magazine) he still finds time to romance beautiful Celeste Yarnall and belt out two songs; Almost in Love and Wonderful World.

Speedway

Speedway is a 1968 action film musical film starring Elvis Presley as a racecar driver and Nancy Sinatra as his love interest.

Scenes were shot at the Lowe’s Motor Speedway in Concord, North Carolina. The film features guest appearances by several of the top stock-car — better known now as NASCAR — drivers of the day.

This would be the final “formula” musical film of Presley’s career. His later films would be less musical and more adult in tone.

Although the film was completed in the early summer of 1967, it was not released in theatres until the spring of 1968. It was Elvis’s last real box-office hit.

Speedway is 1968 MGM car-racing film starring Elvis Presley. Elvis Presley, Nancy Sinatra and Bill Bixby costar in a musical comedy that features Elvis as stock-car champion Steve Grayson, a generous soul who is always sharing his winnings with people in need.

Partly due to his generosity and partly because of his manager’s love of gambling, Steve finds himself owing the government back taxes.

Sinatra costars as IRS agent Susan Jacks, while Bixby plays his bumbling manager, Kenny Donford. Susan attempts to put Steve on a budget that will allow him to pay off the government in installments. Steve tries to soften the all-business agent with romance and music, but she thinks him frivolous and irresponsible. But her tune changes when she realizes that Steve’s latest charity case is a former stock-car driver with five daughters who has fallen on hard times. Eventually Susan is able to keep Steve on a budget, while Steve is able to keep Susan on his arm.

Stay Away, Joe

In Stay Away, Joe, Elvis Presley stars as rodeo rider Joe Lightcloud, a Navajo whose family still lives on the reservation. Joe persuades his congressman to give him 20 heifers and a prize bull so he and his father, played by Burgess Meredith, can prove that the Navajos can successfully raise cattle on the reservation. If their experiment is successful, then the government will help all the Navajo people. But Joe’s buddy accidentally barbecues the prize bull, while Joe sells the heifers to buy plumbing and other home improvements for his stepmother, portrayed by Katy Jurado. Former leading lady Joan Blondell appears as tavern owner Glenda Callahan, whose daughter, played by Quentin Dean, can’t seem to stay away from the girl-chasing Joe.

Elvis Presley played a Native American for the second time in his career in the musical comedy Stay Away, Joe, based on a best-selling book by Dan Cushman. This time, however, instead of being a relevant commentary on prejudice – as was the superior Flaming Star – the film stereotypes American Indians as shiftless and irresponsible.

Elvis stars as rodeo rider Joe Lightcloud, a Navajo whose family still lives on the reservation. Joe persuades his congressman to give him 20 heifers and a prize bull so he and his father, played by Burgess Meredith, can prove that the Navajos can successfully raise cattle on the reservation. If their experiment is successful, then the government will help all the Navajo people. But Joe’s buddy accidentally barbecues the prize bull, while Joe sells the heifers to buy plumbing and other home improvements for his stepmother, portrayed by Katy Jurado. Former leading lady Joan Blondell appears as tavern owner Glenda Callahan, whose daughter, played by Quentin Dean, can’t seem to stay away from the girl-chasing Joe.